Archive for the ‘New Years Eve’ Category

Réveillon

December 31, 2009

This was in my email inbox this morning, 31 December 2009:

U.S. EMBASSY PARIS, FRANCE

NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATIONS

This Warden Message alerts U.S. citizens to the latest information on New Year’s Eve celebrations in Paris and other urban centers in France.

Outdoor New Year’s Eve celebrations in Paris and other urban centers in France can be boisterous.  Last year, U.S. citizens reported that glass bottles were hurled, extensive public drinking and drunkenness occurred, and sporadic fighting broke out in Paris around the Champs Élyéees, the Champ de Mars, and Trocadero.  Parked cars being set ablaze is also a fairly common feature of revelry in France, occurring even in upscale neighborhoods.

Violent and boisterous behavior can be expected in spite of increased police and gendarme forces.  U.S. citizens who venture out on New Year’s Eve should be aware of the potential dangers mentioned above and are reminded to maintain a high level of vigilance and to take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness.

Note that driving and parking restrictions will be in effect in the above-mentioned areas as early as 21h30.

United States Embassy, American Citizen Services Unit, 4, avenue Gabriel, 75382 Paris Cedex 08, France

Réveillon is actually the name of the all-night meal the French traditionally have to celebrate the New Year’s (or Christmas) Eve, usually with family and friends in private homes. In larger cities like Paris, apparently, it also reverts to its root in the word “revel,” which means a noisy celebration, or to party, get drunk, raise the roof, and paint the town red. Here in the rural part of the south of France, I suspect there will be less car-burning and more feasting involved in the revelry. I’ve heard that there are, indeed, traditional torch-led grape-picking excursions into the vineyards at midnight (accompanied by the drinking of hot mulled wine, of course). A couple of villages over from Saint Araille there will be a public réveillon tonight, but we—with small children and a limited budget—will stay in (safe from any car-burning) and have our own little feast of pâté, brie, baguettes, fresh fruit and salad from the garden. We hope the skies will remain clear for the full moon lunar eclipse at 8:15 p.m. Maybe we’ll allow the kids to stay up (if they can) for the line-up of family movies on BBC1, light a few sparklers and watch for fireworks (or torch-led grape harvesters) from the tower balcony at midnight.

I think it is simply human to mark time. The cyclical progression of the seasons, the march of the constellations across the sky, the daily movement of light and dark, the birth, youth, adulthood, and death we witness in our own bodies and in the lives of others: sometimes we need to mark the ending of a cycle and the beginning of something new. This might be at the turning of a New Year on the Gregorian calendar, the first day of a new week (based on the seven days of creation in the book of Genesis), the night of the new moon, the solstice, the date of a person’s birth or death, the sunrise or sunset, or some completely random or personal return. Some folks say that every moment is a new beginning—the cliché of opportunity to start again at any time. We all begin again, again and again. Why?

For me, it is the opportunity and optimism of newness. Something within me needs to be perceived or conceptualized (whether true or not) as open and possible. A chance for rebirth, reinvention. A new life, bursting from the egg of possibility.

And birth, certainly, is always reason for celebration. If that means you need to burn a car, well, I suppose if it’s your own car and you can do it safely, by all means, go ahead and burn a car to mark your new beginning. Leave those scorched hulks to the junkyard. Walk and breath the air in this new year. Revel in it.

Hindu calendar